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  • Analysis of Rickettsia typhi-Infected and Uninfected Cat Flea (Ctenocephalides felis) Midgut cDNA Libraries: Deciphering Molecular Pathways Involved in Host Response to R. typhi Infection
    UMB Dataset

    Authors
    Abdu F. Azad
    Sheila M. Dreher-Lesnick
    Shane M. Ceraul
    Sky C. Lesnick
    4 more author(s)...
    Description

    Murine typhus is a febrile disease caused by the bacterium, Rickettsia typhi (R. typhi), and transmitted via infected fleas. This study investigated midgut responses of infected versus uninfected cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) by constructing cDNA libraries and examining transcript levels. Select C. felis serine proteases, GTPases and defense response genes were compared to identify differences in gene expression between the two states of infection. A total of 1152 transcripts from both libraries were sequenced, generating 906 high quality sequences, 472 from the uninfected and 434 from the infected midgut library.

    Subject
    Ctenocephalides
    Gene Expression Profiling
    Rickettsia typhi
    Transcription, Genetic
    Timeframe
    2009
    Access Rights
    Free to All
  • Complete mitochondrial genome of the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis
    UMB Dataset

    Authors
    Joseph J. Gillespie
    Victoria I. Verhoeve
    Mariah L. Plumer
    Timothy P. Driscoll
    2 more author(s)...
    Description

    With over 2,500 identified species across the globe, fleas are notorious veterinary pests and vectors of pathogens, including Rickettsia typhi (murine typhus), R. felis (murine typhus-like illness), Bartonella henselae (cat-scratch disease), and myxoma virus (Myxomatosis). Speciation of fleas is reliant on distinguishing morphological features; however, studies have also used certain mitochondrial genes for systematic analyses. This dataset is comprised of the C. felis mitochondrial genome, a novel resource for comparative genomics of fleas and other insects. The genome (Genbank accession number: MT594468) encodes the full repertoire of 37 genes, including 22 tRNAs, 13 protein coding genes, and 2 rRNAs with the conserved synteny observed in those of other Siphonaptera mitogenomes and the general insect mitochondrial gene order.

    Subject
    Ctenocephalides
    Genome
    Siphonaptera
    Access Rights
    Free to All
  • Control of Glucose Metabolism is Important in Tenogenic Differentiation of Progenitors Derived From Human Injured Tendons
    UMB Dataset

    Authors
    Soutarou Izumi
    Satoru Otsuru
    Nobuo Adachi
    Ngozi Akabudike
    1 more author(s)...
    Description

    Glucose metabolism is altered in injured and healing tendons. However, the mechanism by which it is involved in the pathogenesis of the tendon healing process remains unclear. Injured tendons do not completely heal and often induce fibrous scar and chondroid lesion. Connective tissue progenitor cells appear in injured tendons and can contribute to healing and chondroid degeneration. Using metabolomic analysis, this study investigated the role of progenitors in glycolysis with regard to chondrogenic and tenogenic differentiation in the tendon healing process. Progenitor cells were isolated from 2 human injured Achilles and 5 human injured flexor tendons, cultured, and used for 13-C glucose metabolic analysis (flexor) and 2-deoxy-D-glucose analysis (2DG) (Achilles). This dataset is comprised of multiple graphical representations and images associated with: characterization of human injured tendon progenitor cells (hITPC), expression of tendon related genes via qPCR, flux of [1,2-13C] glucose to glycolysis, pentose phosphate and lactate synthesis pathways, flux of [1,2-13C] glucose to tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and amino acids derived from TCA cycle intermediates, inhibition of chondrogenic differentiation by 2DG, and stimulation of MKX gene expression by 2DG.

    Subject
    Glucose/metabolism
    Tendon Injuries
  • Amish Complex Genetic Disease Database
    UMB Dataset

    Description

    The Amish Research Group of the University of Maryland School of Medicine has been studying the Old Order Amish population in Lancaster County, PA, since 1993. This database currently consists of health-related data on over 7,000 adults resulting from studies ranging from population and basic science to clinical and translational research. Areas of investigation include: Cardiovascular Risk, Diabetes, Bone Health, Blood Pressure, Vascular Imaging, Aging, Breast Tissue Density, Platelet Aggregation, Microbiome, Wellness, and Brain Imaging. Extensive genetic data (genotyping and sequencing) is also available.

    Subject
    Amish
    Ethnic Groups/genetics
    Genetics, Population
    Health Status Indicators
    Geographic Coverage
    Pennsylvania
    Access Rights
    Access granted on an individual basis dependent upon request and consent considerations
    Local Experts
    Alan R. Shuldiner
    Braxton C. Mitchell
  • Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA)

    Alternate Title(s)
    OPPERA
    Description

    This dataset is the result of a multi-center, 7 year prospective investigation into the biopsychosocial, environmental, and genetic risk factors associated with the onset and persistence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The OPPERA project consisted of 4 observational studies: a prospective cohort study of first-onset TMD, a baseline case-control study of chronic TMD, a matched case-control study of incident TMD, and a prospective case-cohort study of the course of TMD. Over 3,000 volunteers between the ages of 18-44 participated in the research. The data collected includes sociodemographic, psychosocial, clinical, physiological, and genetic (including biological pathways of genetic variants).

    Subject
    Craniomandibular Disorders
    Facial Pain
    Risk Factors
    Geographic Coverage
    Florida
    Maryland
    New York (State)
    North Carolina
    Access Rights
    Submission of a Data Access Request via the dbGaP controlled access portal
    Local Experts
    Joel D. Greenspan
    Meg Johantgen
    Shijun Zhu
    Susan G. Dorsey
  • Sleep Disturbances in Neurobehaviorally Challenged Children with Sickle Cell Disease
    UMB Dataset

    Authors
    Valerie E. Rogers
    Eboni I. Lance
    Description

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) experience neurodevelopmental decline over time. They also tend to have short duration, poor quality sleep and elevated fatigue levels. This study measured sleep via actigraphy over one week and cognitive and behavioral measures in 19 children and adolescents with SCD. Aged 7-18 years, the majority of participants were referred for neurodevelopmental testing due to academic or behavioral difficulties. Data was collected from parent report, medical record, and included age, sex, race, SCD genotype, results of neuroimaging studies including brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocities, and current use of hydroxyl urea or chronic blood transfusion. Additionally, parents completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), participants completed the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT), and both completed the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale.

    Subject
    Anemia, Sickle Cell
    Neurodevelopmental Disorders
    Sleep Wake Disorders
    Access Rights
    Free to All
  • Prevalence, Control, and Treatment of Diabetes, Hypertension, and High Cholesterol in the Amish
    UMB Dataset

    Authors
    Braxton C. Mitchell
    Shisi He
    Kathleen A. Ryan
    Elizabeth A. Streeten
    11 more author(s)...
    Description

    Diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia are three of the major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of death in the United States. The burden of these disorders is not uniform across the country primarily due to socioeconomic status, cultural practices, and lifestyle. To evaluate the effect of these disparities, this study compared the prevalence of the 3 conditions in a subpopulation in the US with that of the general population. The Old Order Amish (OOA) community located in rural Pennsylvania is characterized by distinctive sociocultural practices that include a very cohesive social structure and limited use of modern technologies and medication. A total of 5377 OOA individuals took part in a community-wide survey which included a physical exam and fasting blood draw. The prevalence of the 3 risk factors in the Amish was then compared to the European Caucasian subsample of the 2013–2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). This dataset includes demographics, physical examination values, medication history, clinical measures associated blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose, and statistical assessment and comparison data.

    Subject
    Amish
    Epidemiology
    Heart Disease Risk Factors
    Geographic Coverage
    Pennsylvania
  • GISAID

    Alternate Title(s)
    Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data
    Description

    "The GISAID Initiative promotes the rapid sharing of data from all influenza viruses and the coronavirus causing COVID-19. This includes genetic sequence and related clinical and epidemiological data associated with human viruses, and geographical as well as species-specific data associated with avian and other animal viruses, to help researchers understand how viruses evolve and spread during epidemics and pandemics. GISAID does so by overcoming disincentive hurdles and restrictions, which discourage or prevented sharing of virological data prior to formal publication." (From "Mission")

    Subject
    COVID-19
    Influenza in Birds
    Influenza, Human
    Geographic Coverage
    Global
    Access Rights
    Free to All
    Local Experts
    Davide Zella
    Francesca Benedetti
    Robert C. Gallo
  • Mutations in Diphosphoinositol-Pentakisphosphate Kinase PPIP5K2 are associated with hearing loss in human and mouse
    UMB Dataset

    Authors
    Saima Riazuddin
    Rizwan Yousaf
    Chunfang Gu
    Zubair M. Ahmed
    4 more author(s)...
    Description

    Genetically complex non-syndromic recessively inherited hearing loss (NSRHL) comprises approximately 75% of hereditary deafness. This study investigated NSRHL in two large consanguineous Pakistani families. Exome sequencing coupled with homozygosity mapping was used to identify a missense variant in PPIP5K2 gene associated with nonsyndromic, prelingual sensorineural deafness. Biochemical analysis was performed to compare wild type human PPIP5K2 with the variant. Additional research was conducted on mouse mutants to observe the effects on the outer hair cells and hearing thresholds. This dataset includes genetic, hearing function, gene expression, and histological data and images.

    Subject
    Hearing Loss
    Point Mutation
    Geographic Coverage
    Pakistan
    Access Rights
    Free to All